Mitigation: Key strategies

This section sets out the key UK strategies applicable to climate change mitigation. It summarises the impacts of each strategy on sustainable energy policy making as well as providing detail if you’d like to know more.

Summary of impacts

Strategy Impact on sustainable energy policy making
UK Low Transition Carbon Plan (2009) The plan sets out how the UK will achieve a 34% cut in CO2 equivalent emissions by 2020. Its impact for local authority policy making stems from the suite of documents that accompany it that set out how the carbon reduction will be achieved, such as the Renewable Energy Strategy, covered below.
UK Renewable Energy Strategy (2009) The UK Renewable Energy Strategy describes how the UK will meet its legally binding target to supply 15% of all of the energy it uses from renewable sources by 2020. There are several impacts for local authority policy making that flow from this, namely:
• The need for an increased strategic focus on assessing the potential for and then facilitating the deployment of renewable energy through spatial planning and development management, as set out in policy objective SE3
• The potential role for local authorities to promote renewable energy deployment through developing local renewable energy targets and delivery plans, as set out in policy objective SE4.
Household Energy Management Strategy This provides support for developing district heating networks to serve existing dwellings, and other buildings, in suitable, higher density areas. With the end of CERT in 2012, there will be a new focus on partnership working between local authorities and energy companies to deliver area wide programmes for reducing carbon emissions, with district heating being one of the key measures. The implication for policy making is that it may provide funding opportunities for local authorities to develop such networks, as set out in several of the policy objectives set out in this toolkit.


 

UK Low Transition Carbon Plan (2009)

UK Low Transition Carbon Plan (2009)

The Department of Energy and Climate Change (DECC) published a White Paper, the UK Low Carbon Transition Plan in July 2009. The plan sets out how the UK will achieve a 34% cut in CO2 equivalent emissions by 2020.The Plan is accompanied by a suite of documents, including:

  • The UK Renewable Energy Strategy
  • The UK Low Carbon Industrial Strategy
  • Consultation on Renewable Electricity Financial Incentives
  • Low Carbon Transport: A Greener Future


As it is of particular importance to the Climate Change PPS, further information is provided on the Renewable Energy Strategy below.

UK Renewable Energy Strategy (2009)

UK Renewable Energy Strategy (2009)

The UK Renewable Energy Strategy describes how the UK will meet its legally binding target to supply 15% of all of the energy it uses from renewable sources by 2020. It anticipates that this will be achieved by using renewable energy technologies to supply:

  • Over 30% of our electricity
  • 12% of our heat
  • 10% of our energy for transport

To help achieve these targets the strategy includes actions in four principle areas

1) In the planning process. This includes:

  • establishing a new planning process for nationally significant infrastructure projects (as introduced in the Planning Act 2008, see below);
  • support for English regions to develop evidence-based strategies for achieving 2020 renewable energy targets;
  • developing skills and providing resources to support swifter development and implementation of regional and local energy planning policy;
  • helping to resolve environmental impacts of renewable energy technologies and address spatial conflicts with other uses such as radar and navigation

2) In establishing the Office of Renewable Energy Deployment.

This office will work with other Government departments and stakeholders to remove barriers in the planning system, strengthen the supply chain and stimulate investment.

3) In extending a range of financial mechanisms. This includes:

  • extending the Renewables Obligation for large scale renewable electricity generation
  • amending the Renewable Transport Fuel Obligation
  • renewable heat incentive and feed-in-tariffs to pay a guaranteed premium for each unit of renewable heat or small-scale renewable electricity generation

4) In investing in emerging technologies. This includes:

  • supporting offshore wind, marine energy and advanced biofuels
  • investing in the Severn Estuary tidal power project
     

This strategy proposes a new focus on district heating in suitable communities and removal of barriers to the development of networks. It encourages the development of combined heat and power and better use of surplus heat through carbon-pricing mechanisms.

The Strategy responds to a consultation on household energy management issued in 2009, and sets out phases to meet both the overall 2020 carbon goal, and interim commitment to ensure that, by 2015, every household will have installed loft and cavity wall insulation where it is practical to do so.

By 2020 up to 7 million homes will have received eco-upgrades, including improvements such as solid wall insulation or renewable energy generating technologies. The Strategy paves the way for Pay As You Save green finance. It also signals a move to a new, transparent and stretching obligation on energy companies and an emphasis on partnership working with local authorities in delivery, including the development of district heating networks.

Priority will be given to those on lower incomes and the most vulnerable with energy companies required to provide help to these groups.

www.decc.gov.uk/en/content/cms/what_we_do/consumers/saving_energy/hem/hem.aspx